Greater Augusta Coalition Against Adult Abuse
Report Adult Abuse: 1-888-83-ADULT
Support Groups

Alzheimer’s Support Group
540-949-4151 or 540-885-9500

Cancer Patients’ Support Group
540-245-7105

Caregivers’ Club “Lean On Me”
Support Group 540-245-7105

Heart to Heart Grief Support Group -
Lutheran Family Services of VA
540-383-2902

Stroke Club Support Group
540-332-4047
Shenandoah Valley Adult Protective Services
540-942-6648
Transportation Agencies

CATS (Coordinated Area Transportation
Services) 540-943-9302

Logisticare Transportation for Medicaid
patients 866-679-6330

Augusta Health Transportation
540-332-5777

Priority Transport  888-774-2621

B2B Transportation 540-941-8686

Shenandoah Shuttle (Waynesboro)
540-885-5576

TED (Transportation for the Elderly and
Disabled) - 540-949-7141
On June 6, 2011, GACAAA presented training
on elder abuse for Virginia law enforcement,
protective services, and elder law attorneys.
Videos of the presentations by Paul
Greenwood and Linda Matkins are available.
For more information, contact Anne See at 1(800) 237-0141 or asee@brls.org
ABOUT GACAAA                           
                         
The Greater Augusta Coalition Against
Adult Abuse (GACAAA) was formed on
November 1, 2010 when Blue Ridge
Legal Services received a 10 month
mini-grant from the Administration on
Aging.

The mission of GACAAA is
to promote
safe communities free from abuse,
neglect, and exploitation by identifying
and utilizing coalition resources
through partnerships, community
action, education, and advocacy and to
address circumstances that make
adults vulnerable
. By educating the
community to recognize and report
adult abuse, neglect and financial
exploitation, we envision a community
where vulnerable adults are valued and
treated with respect, honor and dignity
and have safe, secure lives free from
abuse.

The Coalition sponsors educational
events for the public and professionals
on Adult Abuse and has a table display
and materials available for health fairs,
seminars, and other community events.  
We hope that our proactive steps will
help prevent further acts of
exploitation and abuse of vulnerable
adults in the community.
News Headlines
A few years ago, Anne S. See and other staff
members at Blue Ridge Legal Services
observed increasing numbers of cases involving
financial exploitation and other types of abuse
perpetrated upon vulnerable adults. Many, she
noticed, were older, and some had disabilities.

So, See and other staff members decided to
take action. They applied for funding from the
Administration on Aging, part of the U.S.
Department of Health and Human Services.
They received a $10,000 grant, and in January
2011 the Greater Augusta Coalition Against
Adult Abuse began its work.

Now, See co-chairs the coalition, along with Cpl.
Derek Almarode of the Augusta County Sheriff’s
Office. The group has helped to coordinate
training and information sessions for law
enforcement officials, social workers and others
who work with vulnerable, often older, adults.

The coalition’s work continues Thursday with a
guest presentation by Christine Kieffer, senior
director of the FINRA Investor Education
Foundation, at 3 p.m. at the Valley Licensing
Office, 57 Beam Ave., Fishersville. People
interested in attending can call (800) 237-0141
or 433-1830.

The presentation will dig into ways to help
people combat financial crimes against
vulnerable adults.

“We want to make sure we have tools for
advocates who may have encountered people
in a crisis situation,” Kieffer said.

See, who works as a public benefits and elder
law paralegal with Blue Ridge Legal Services,
with offices in Harrisonburg, suggested that
money is often entangled in the abuse she
sees. “Financial exploitation, in particular, we’re
seeing a lot of,” she said. She cited figures from
Virginia’s Adult Protective Service division
indicating 20,704 reports of abuse, neglect or
financial exploitation in Virginia in 2013. She
said more than half of those reports were
substantiated.

Of the substantiated reports, See said, 74
percent of the victims were 60 years old or older.

See said a key goal of the coalition has been to
create awareness among all residents, and she
also noted free training sessions for law
enforcement and other officials who investigate
and prosecute crimes involving vulnerable
adults.
February 26, 2014
Groups work to protect vulnerable
adults
The Six Common Cons
You Should Avoid
Link below to check out resources from AARP on
methods designed to prey on older Americans
and the baker's dozen scams commonly used:
Romance              Charity         Grandparents
Home Repair     Health Care     Investment
TRAINING EVENT:
FINANCIAL EXPLOITATION:
IT'S A CRIME!
Wednesday, 23 April, 2014
Keynote Address: The Brooke Astor Trial: A
Sordid Case of Elder Financial Abuse
More information: here.
Sign up to attend this event: here.
Presented by Elizabeth Loewy
Assistant Deputy Attorney with the NY
County DA's Elder Abuse Unit
90 minute interactive discussion:
Assessing Decision-Making Capacity in
Seniors
Featuring Dr. Gary Oberlender, a
Geriatrician and President of
SeniorEvaluations
VCPEA announces 45 scholarships
to the May 28-30, 2014
Annual Conference
Open to professionals in a variety of occupations
who provide services to older adults and are
interested in increasing their awareness of the
issues of adult abuse, neglect or exploitation.
Conference Information: VCPEA Website
Application Deadline: 5PM April 16, 2014